Home » John Donne (46 Papers)

THE ONSLAUGHT OF LOVEDuring the eighteenth century, many poets explored the concepts of love. Many of these poems discussed lost loves, or unreturned love. John Donne discussed his feelings towards love in his poem "The Broken Heart." Donne personifies love in this poem by saying how once graspe ... John Donne discussed his feelings towards love in his poem "The Broken Heart." Donne personifies love in this poem by saying how once grasped by love, it is impossible to recover from it. ... Donne is saying that love cannot be turned on and off. ... (L. 28-32) Donne says that after being completely enveloped by love, once the love is over, one will never be able to love again. ... In "The Broken Heart" John Donne feels that once love takes hold of the heart, it is detrimental to a person once that love is vanquished. ...
Ideas are clearly the imaginative core of John Donne's poetry. This isvividly evident through the study of Donne's poetry, and in particular hisworks; "The Relique", "The Sunne Rising" and "A Valediction: forbiddingmourning". Donne utilizes a focus concept throughout his array of poetic works, and ... Ideas are clearly the imaginative core of John Donne's poetry. ... Thethematic setting and central focus of the poem is that of love surpassingphysical boundaries. ... This conceit is set toconvey the idea of love surpassing physical boundaries. ... This again supports the statement that ideas arethe imaginative core of Donnes poetry.Through an extensive study of John Donnes poetry and, in particular,extensive study of "The Relique", "The Sunne Rising" and "A Valediction:forbidding mourning", it is evident that the author employs a vast array oftechniques to convey various complex ideas...
John Donne is regarded as the forerunner of Metaphysical poets. His poems, whether cynical or idealistic, are characterized by fantastic conceits, metaphors and hyperbole. Donne's images are usually untraditional. In his poems about love he does not employ those images which are usually associated w ... John Donne is regarded as the forerunner of Metaphysical poets. ... Donne's images are usually untraditional. In his poems about love he does not employ those images which are usually associated with love such as roses, beauties, moon and the like. ... Although he is too biased against love, the conceits and metaphors Donne employs are novel and fantastic. ... That is exact the effect Donne wants to bring about through his conceits....
Imagery in "The Broken Heart"John Donnes' poem "The Broken Heart" is full of imagery, used to portray his broken heart. Donne uses the imagery so we can get a visual picture of what love means to him. He uses the imagery because it's necessary to see a picture of the pain he lives with. Donne use ... Imagery in "The Broken Heart"John Donnes' poem "The Broken Heart" is full of imagery, used to portray his broken heart. Donne uses the imagery so we can get a visual picture of what love means to him. ... In these lines Donne gives us the image of a hand of love and a big heart touching it. ... Donne also gives us the image of love swallowing his heart whole. ... In the last line of this quote, Donne says that once you have loved someone that deeply you can never feel love like that again.John Donne uses several aspects of imagery to portray a broken heart. ...
In John Donne's poetry he uses allot of images to relate to biblical themes. He uses similar views the Jesus had in the new testament. In some parables that are in the new testament that relate to some of Donne's poetry. Some of the images that both Donne and the parables had are very similar to eac ... In John Donne's poetry he uses allot of images to relate to biblical themes. ... In Holy Sonnet X John Donne explains his faith. Death, commonly viewed as an all-powerful force against life, is otherwise described in John Donne's Holy Sonnet 10. ... Where people loved Jesus there were those who hated him too. ... Donne, on the other hand, has his own philosophy. ...
By Referring Closely to at least 4 poems, examine the distinct characteristics of John Donne poetry, paying particular attention to the Relationship Between Intellect and Emotion.John Donne was born in 1572 and both of his parents were Roman Catholics and as a result religion played a very prominent ... Through this poem and many other many of John Donne's distinct characteristics come through. ... Even though John Donne was a man of the cloth had a religious man, he still had temptations and encounters with women. This poem has details of his feelings about one of his loved ones and is about love in the highest order. ... These are also examples of paradox and are typical of a metaphysical poet such as John Donne and as a result are typical of his poetry. ... The first is the intense dramatic sense that John Donne creates throughout his poems and many of his poems are dramatic monologue...
Love, Reflected Through the Work of John DonneJohn Donne writes with an overwhelming and intense feeling that is strongly reflected in his work. Much of his poetry is written for his wife, reflecting his unwavering emotion for her, however, the motivation of God and the church fuels his writing as ... Love, Reflected Through the Work of John DonneJohn Donne writes with an overwhelming and intense feeling that is strongly reflected in his work. ... In many of his poems it can be seen that Donne speaks of love with strong emotion. ... Donne wonders why people are worrying about their love so heavily. ... After the death of his beloved wife, Donne writes of the love between the church and the Lord. ... His unparalleled love for her seems to have made Donne feel positive about life. ...
True love is something hard to find. Some people doubt if it even exists. Throughout time people have been forever searching for that perfect soul mate to spend the rest of their life with. John Donne and the musical band Foreigner are both artists who have put their thoughts for their quest of true ... John Donne and the musical band Foreigner are both artists who have put their thoughts for their quest of true love into words. John Donne expresses his search in time in his poem, "The Canonization" and Foreigner does so in their song, " I Want To Know What Love Is."In John Donne's poem "The Canonization" there is a speaker telling someone about the disbeliefs of the capability of finding true love. ... There Donne is expressing his real concerns with love in the first line of that stanza. ... Donne has successfully used the passage of time to convey his feeling on love and relationshi...
In "Love's Alchemy," John Donne sets up an analogy between the Platonists, who try, endlessly, to discover spiritual love, and the alchemists, who in Donne's time, tried to extract gold from baser metals. This analogy allows Donne to express his beliefs that such spiritual love does not exist and th ... In "Love's Alchemy," John Donne sets up an analogy between the Platonists, who try, endlessly, to discover spiritual love, and the alchemists, who in Donne's time, tried to extract gold from baser metals. This analogy allows Donne to express his beliefs that such spiritual love does not exist and those who are searching for it are only wasting their time. ... Donne explains that some have experienced more love than he has, and, in having done so, have penetrated "deeper" into "love's hidden mystery," that is, they have reached a point beyond sensual love where they have found it...
John Donne is known today as being the chief writer of verse known as metaphysical poetry, which features elaborate conceits and surprising symbols, wrapped up in original, challenging language structures. John Donne was born to a Roman Catholic family in 1572 on Bread Street in London. Although he ... John Donne is known today as being the chief writer of verse known as metaphysical poetry, which features elaborate conceits and surprising symbols, wrapped up in original, challenging language structures. John Donne was born to a Roman Catholic family in 1572 on Bread Street in London. ... The last poem John Donne wrote before he died was Hymn to God, my God, in my Sickness. ... Many people probably do write about death and their lives after death.It was very ironic of Donne to write love poetry and religious poetry. ... Donne always wanted to fuse love and religion, two contradicting things...
The Ultimate Spiritual Plateau: An Analysis of John Donne's Holy Sonnet 10In John Donne's "Holy Sonnet 10," the speaker finds himself in an intense struggle to obtain the ultimate relationship, which is to have God in his life. He feels distant from God because of his sins and finds it difficult to ... The Ultimate Spiritual Plateau: An Analysis of John Donne's Holy Sonnet 10In John Donne's "Holy Sonnet 10," the speaker finds himself in an intense struggle to obtain the ultimate relationship, which is to have God in his life. ... Despite his unsavory human qualities, the speaker has a profound love of God, "Yet dearly I love you, and would be loved fain..." (9) However, since the speaker is inherently flawed, he feels betrothed to Satan. ... Donne desires for God to seize him from the "usurper," the Devil himself. ... Donne sees rape as a spiritual purification of the soul. ... In ...
Air and AngelsJohn Donne's poem "Air and Angels" focuses on the medieval beliefs respecting angels. Angels are commonly seen as messengers of God or appear as a conventional representation of a human form with wings. A popular theory in medieval times assumed angels under certain circumstances did ... John Donne's theory is that love cannot exist in nothing or in things, but somewhere in-between. ... John Donne discusses the ideal of "ballast love," ballast meaning anything heavy carried in a ship to give stability. This ideal of "ballast love" used by John Donne means that he had intended to steady or by so embody love. John Donne discovered instead that the wares which he placed upon his love "would sink admiration," meaning his love would not please contemplation. ... This in-between of love, which was clearly illustrated by John Donne, is in fact air and angels....
SongThis poem by John Donne is about a relationship with him and his lover. In this relationship he has to leave even though he does not want to. He compares their separation to death and says since they go through small separations like these that they will be ready for a big separation such as d ... SongThis poem by John Donne is about a relationship with him and his lover. ... This quote means that since they have true love they can never truly be separated.There are two kinds of love, agape and eros. Agapaic love is the kind that is displayed in this relationship. ... Eros love is the kind of love that is based on physical attraction and only the things that can be physically touched. Eros love is centered mainly around sex. ...
Is it possible to fabricate profound passions and emotions, or are genuine reasons compulsory to evoke such feelings? All of John Donne's verse, his love sonnets and his religious poems, can be distinguished by a blend of passion and reason. However, the reasons for his poems are essential to comple ... All of John Donne's verse, his love sonnets and his religious poems, can be distinguished by a blend of passion and reason. ... In this his physicians, "by their love" have become map readers, studying him to discover the cause of sins, just as "cosmographers" study maps. ... After John Donne pleads to God for salvation he begins to reconcile his numerous sins. ... In the last stanza, John Donne confronts himself on the sin of pride. ... John Donne supports this theme with the Latin idiom "morieris," meaning thou must die. ...
The Perfect LoveOn any given day at the airport, couples in love can be seen saying goodbye to one another. Everyday, thousands of people are forced to say goodbye to a loved one for a period of time for one reason or another. People react to this period of separation in a number of ways. Some cr ... In John Donne's poem, "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning", the concept of love and separation is addressed. In this poem, Donne is able to use metaphors in order to help show how a perfect love says goodbye.Surprisingly, this poem, which is a love poem, opens with the idea of the death of virtuous men who "pass mildly away". ... In this stanza, Donne transitions from talking about death to a man talking to his loved one. ... Through this metaphor, Donne is saying that the greater love does not have to mean that there should be a big emotional scene. ... In this poem, Donne refers to...
The seventeenth century was an era of beautiful poetry. Two poets in particular, Andrew Marvell and John Donne, wrote carpe diem poetry full of vivid imagery and metaphysical conceits. Each conveyed the message of "living for the now." This message can be clearly seen in the poems "To his Coy Mis ... Two poets in particular, Andrew Marvell and John Donne, wrote carpe diem poetry full of vivid imagery and metaphysical conceits. ... Line 8 reads "I would love you ten years before the flood," most likely signifying that he will love her through thick and thin. ... To his Coy Mistress" is similar in many ways to Donne's "Flea." ... Donne uses the metaphysical conceit of a flea to symbolize the love shared between them. ... Donne also uses iambic tetrameter in the AA, BB, CC, etc., form. ...
What does Donne tell the reader about his religion and attitude to the two established Churches in his sonnets? Refer to Sonnet 18 and at least one other poem in your answer. John Donne was born into a prosperous Roman Catholic family during the reign of Elizabeth I, when England was anti-Catholic. ... John Donne was born into a prosperous Roman Catholic family during the reign of Elizabeth I, when England was anti-Catholic. ... He writes "spouse" to represent the true Church, as the Bible mentions that Christ loves his church like a man loves his wife. ... In the last lines, Donne uses an extended metaphor to describe his love for the true Church as well as his desperation to find the true church. ... He admits that he is in love with Christ's spouse and asks God to release his love for her so he can seduce the Church. ... Sonnet 18 shows Donne's desperation to find the real Chur...
William Empson begins his critical essay on John Donne's "A Valediction: of Weeping" with this statement. Empson here plays the provocateur for the critic who wishes to disagree with the notion that Donne's intentions were perhaps less base than the sincere valediction of a weeping man. Indeed, ... William Empson begins his critical essay on John Donne's "A Valediction: of Weeping" with this statement. ... Indeed, "A Valediction" concerns a parting; Donne is going to sea and is leaving his nameless, loved other in England, and the "Valediction" is his emotive poesy describing the moment. ... The pregnancy that has affected Donne has given birth to his tears, and hence has also "fathered" has love. ... At first glance, Donne would appear to be saying that once parted, their love is nothing. Empson suggest that these lines mean that Donne believes she will cheat on him when he ...
The Unity of the Mind and BodyBoth Michel De Montaigne and John Donne argue that the cultivation of the mind is linked to the well being of the body. Both argue that a mind void of proper enrichment and education will lead to an unhealthy body. However, Montaigne argues that the appropriate means ... The Unity of the Mind and BodyBoth Michel De Montaigne and John Donne argue that the cultivation of the mind is linked to the well being of the body. ... Contemplate, what you will approve, So you will let me love"(pg.28).Here Donne states that to him the ultimate knowledge is that of love and that he would choose this before all other earthly types of knowledge. Donne argues that love can teach all necessary knowledge in life. ... (pg.60).Donne reveals hear some of the lessons that love has taught to him. ... It is evident then that Donne's support for the imaginative went as far as ...
John Donne was the leading enthusiast of a style of poetry known as metaphysical poetry, which flourished in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. This specific type of poetry features elaborate conceits and surprising symbols, wrapped up in original, challenging language structures, w ... John Donne was the leading enthusiast of a style of poetry known as metaphysical poetry, which flourished in the late sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. ... In the 1590s, at the time when John Donne produced his Songs and Sonnets, the Petrarchan tradition had already had several centuries of undeniable rule over romantic poetry and literature in general. ... The general verse focused greatly on the unrivalled importance of love in the context of the life of the poet. ... The ideals of courtly love held the woman to be inaccessible however, in the poem The Unreachable Donne's mistr...
The Holy Sonnets By making many references to the Bible, John Donne's Holy Sonnets reveal his want to be accepted and forgiven by God. A fear of death without God's forgiveness of sins is conveyed in these sonnets. Donne expresses extreme anxiety and fright that Satan has taken over his soul and God ... The Holy Sonnets By making many references to the Bible, John Donne's Holy Sonnets reveal his want to be accepted and forgiven by God. ... A central theme of healing and forgiveness imply that John Donne, however much he wrote about God and being holy, wasn't such a holy man all of the time and tried to make up for it in his writing. ... He prays to God that he will be loved as much as he loves. ... They each are like prayers, begging for God to hear them.After reading through and analyzing the Holy Sonnets, it is clear to me that John Donne had a great appreciation for God. He used...
Oh Contriere'There are several similarities and differences in William Shakespeare's "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun," and John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning." Theses two poems discuss and dissect relationships on two basic levels: one level deals with love, and the othe ... Oh Contriere'There are several similarities and differences in William Shakespeare's "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun," and John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning." ... Both possess merit in respect for the time they were written and the style of world that we live in today.In John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning," it is obvious that the man in this poem is madly in love with his women and feels a strong sexual bond with her when he writes "So let us melt, and make no noise" (Kirszner & Mandel 816). ... These two could be married.In...
Oh Contriere'There are several similarities and differences in William Shakespeare's "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun," and John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning." Theses two poems discuss and dissect relationships on two basic levels: one level deals with love, and the othe ... Oh Contriere'There are several similarities and differences in William Shakespeare's "My Mistress' Eyes are Nothing Like the Sun," and John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning." ... Both possess merit in respect for the time they were written and the style of world that we live in today.In John Donne's "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning," it is obvious that the man in this poem is madly in love with his women and feels a strong sexual bond with her when he writes "So let us melt, and make no noise" (Kirszner & Mandel 816). ... These two could be married.In...
During the course of John Donne's life he went through two life stages: the period where he was a wild, fun-loving man; and the second, where he was a well-known, respected man of the church, making him quite the opposite of his former years. Throughout his life he continued to write poetry. Throug ... During the course of John Donne's life he went through two life stages: the period where he was a wild, fun-loving man; and the second, where he was a well-known, respected man of the church, making him quite the opposite of his former years. ... John used this method of poetry to express his love for his wife Anne. John believed that his relationship with Anne had a love that was beyond all simple sublunary lovers, simply meaning that their love was beyond anything any one under the moon would ever experience. ... As John goes on about things, the thought of the love he and Anne share...
The parting of two lovers In the poem "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" by John Donne the speaker of the poem is talking to his lover to tell her that although he is leaving their love will not be effected. It surprised me whe ... The parting of two lovers In the poem "A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning" by John Donne the speaker of the poem is talking to his lover to tell her that although he is leaving their love will not be effected. ... However the speaker describes the love between him and his lover, and there still something bad is happening to mourn and that is his departure and their separation. ... There is a sad tone in the poem that describes souls passing away, and tears being shed for a couple that were so much in love. Their love could ...