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Race, Class and Gender

Asians immigrated into this country with empty pockets and high hopes. However, through hard work and persistent studying they integrated into the American culture and rose in status, equal to the white race. The "model minority" myth is offered to Asian Americans as a token of privilege and acceptance to reward their silent and passive nature. The achievements of Asian Americans are part reality and part myth and that's what the American culture has appeared to miss.

Throughout the article, "the Gap Between Striving and Achieving," by Deborah Woo, speaks of the myths that are brought upon the Asian community. Asians are depicted as an exceptionally accomplished and industrious minority group which have achieved the so-called "American Dream." The Asians are symbolized as highly educated and economically successful. Deborah writes, "Asian Americans are said to save more, study more, and so achieve more (pg. 244)." On the other hand those that are less educated and have low incomes are overlooked by society and therefore unnoticed. Asians are also affixed to certain occupations. For instance, "They tend to be self-employed in small-scale wholesale and retail trade and manufacturing (pg. 247)." Depending on their social and educational status they are concentrated in narrow and selected jobs.

Why then are Latinos, Blacks being held down by discrimination, and why do Asians come to this country and do so well for themselves. It hardly seems fair to the other minorities. Realistically though, there are Asians out there that are below the poverty line and don't receive any form of public assistance. Yet this "model minority" myth 'thrusts them into the role of being models for other minorities.' In some way it takes away from their pride as individuals and stereotypes them as a whole. As the author says, "the myth is based on misconceptions, we are called upon to reexami

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Race, Class and Gender. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 04:39, October 23, 2014, from http://www.directessays.com/viewpaper/66944.html