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The Act of Bowing in Japan

Japan is a country with quite a story to tell. From economic booms to recessions, back to economic booms, Japan is a country with both deep-rooted traditions and social practices; however it is very versatile in it's changing to fit western society. For ventures involving mass production, Japan is a known production company with incredible results. Technologically speaking, Japan is a world leader in computer science and robotics, including ways to speed up productions with the use of different labor robots. After World War II, Japan had gained the identity of the enemy, but as the 20th century progressed, it was again seen as a commodity.

As stated earlier, Japan is a country very heavily influenced by tradition. Bowing is a custom that everyone must become familiar with. The act of bowing may be used in many contexts, ranging from hello and goodbye, to signs of gratitude, and a sign of respect. Hand shaking has become more and more accepted in Japanese business culture today. Although learning the proper process of bowing is important, it is suggested that foreigners do not attempt to bow, as it may appear silly and disrespectful. The appropriate bowing procedure entails placing your arms straight down at your sides with your hands flat against your legs, pausing, and then bending from the hips keeping your back as straight as possible Another important business practice that is different in Japan is the exchange of business cards. In Japanese cultures it is expected that the card be held in two open hands, face up, so the recipient may read the card as it is being presented. "Meishi O Dozo" means take my business card, it should be said before presenting one with your business card. Problems may arise as attempts at these traditional Japanese practices may be seen as disrespectful, so foreign business people must make sure they are presenting themselves properly. Another inte

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The Act of Bowing in Japan. (1969, December 31). In DirectEssays.com. Retrieved 17:15, October 24, 2014, from http://www.directessays.com/viewpaper/88991.html